Why Camping Still Appeals in the Modern Age

Why Camping Still Appeals in the Modern Age

Camping Garbage Can & Portable Utility Bag

Why do you think camping still appeals to us in the age of so many technological advances? It’s a good question and worthy of exploration. Especially in 2020 as many families fled cities for forest vacations. According to Statista, prospective campers rose from 3% to 13% as the coronavirus kept people from modern destinations.

Of course, we all know people who wouldn’t dare spend a night in a tent or a luxury tour bus for that matter. But I have a feeling if these hardliners ever gave camping a chance, they would see the appeal. More accurately, they would feel it.

Camping portable trash can
Cute little sisters roasting hotdogs on sticks at bonfire. Children having fun at camp fire. Camping with kids in fall forest. Family leisure with kids at autumn.

Humans were made for the outdoors.

Cities are, believe it or not, a new thing. Historically speaking, humans have been living outdoors far longer than taking it easy on couches inside comfortable homes. The first real city was created thousands of years ago, which is a long time in our age of evaporating Tweets. Yet, that’s nothing compared to the millions of years mankind spent hunting and gathering outdoors.

The fact is… we are a part of nature. And being outdoors suits us. Sure, Uncle Larry, who watches 14 hours of football each Saturday, would disagree. But even he would feel better if his big-screen TV was set up on the side of a rolling river. Science agrees. One study showed that spending 120 minutes a week in nature is associated with good health and wellbeing. That can mean camping, hiking, or a simple walk at a neighborhood park.

Camping is a mind refreshment.

Living in the modern age you have probably felt that terrible feeling of overwhelm. You know, like you have too much on your plate. Or you feel guilty when you’re resting at home and that office report is just a click away on your home computer. Trust me… your mind can use a break.

Camping makes that possible by creating a natural barrier between you and constant work. You can breathe easy knowing all you need to do is keep warm, eat when hungry, and hang out with your tribe. At home, there’s always something to clean or somewhere you “have to be.”

Real time together.
Some of the best memories family and friends share are from times when they were roughing it in the woods. Like a rainstorm that soaked everything in the tents. Or the wind that nearly toppled the pop-up camper colony. Events like that are not the most fun at the time, but they sure do bond people in ways that social media cannot.

We made Caddycan for people who want to make the most of their time together in the outdoors. Going for a hike around the camp trails doesn’t take much planning when you can drop snacks and drinks into an easy to carry bag. Additionally, no one has an excuse to leave trash on the trails when they can tuck it into the Caddycan .

Make no mistake, families should still make dad carry it around!

Those trails or an evening out in the canoe will last forever in the minds of those who venture out. How many days spent in separate rooms of a high-tech home are forgotten as soon as the next day arrives?

Stand-outdoors.
Besides having time to enjoy each other, people like camping compared to the modern world because the outdoors offers a change of pace. Mother Nature knows how to stand out. It’s not hard when the grind of a 9-5 lifestyle becomes a boring pattern that can lead to loss of purpose and disillusionment.

Camping can slow down your pace.
● Campfire stories.
● Slow-cooked meals.
● Naps in a hammock.

Or it can add serious adventure for those seeking thrills nearby.
● Whitewater rafting.
● Ziplining.
● Skiing and wakeboarding.

Any of those activities can reinvigorate a family and bring them closer.

Toughness factor

Some would argue that modern times are too easy. Making it unnecessary to lean on family and friends like in the old days. Camping can drag us back to caveman days when there was no Google for seeking advice. No YouTube to tell us how to tie a knot or fix a tire.

Out in the middle of nowhere, you have to work together to set up a tent or change a flat tire. Oh, and if you’re on a solo trip, you will learn about self-reliance in a hurry. And what you can live without for a few days.

Of course, at the end of a tough mountain climb, you can ease back into camp for a friendly game of cornhole and a burger . Just be sure to keep a Caddycan close by to toss empty drink cans into. It keeps the area clear of litter and pesky bugs. Plus, by not leaving the cornhole area, you can keep an eye on your cousins who are known for creative score-keeping!

sources: camping uptick https://www.statista.com/statistics/1155347/change-in-share-of-camping-trips-coronavirus/

Nature and wellbeing: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-44097-3